Recipe: Aromatic green or red curry fish

Red Fish Curry

For some people, curry is comfort food. Scents of home and slow cooked goodness that fill a kitchen with strong, earthy aromas. I often crave curry and, if I’m not turning to Roasted Curry Cauliflower, I’m making this recipe. Mostly, I use frozen fish and any hearty white fish will be fine. Avoid tilapia since it’s too delicate and will fall apart. Alternatively, you could substitute peeled, deveined shrimp but, since it cooks quicker, add it to the saucepan with the peppers and basil.

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Recipe: Easy pumpkin roll

Pumpkin Roll

Besides the seasonality of this vegetable, I’ve always wondered why we relegate pumpkin dishes to the fall. It comes in a can year round — which is far easier than spearing a fresh gourd — so we could be enjoying its comforting, smooth and rustic flavors all the time. It might be the cinnamon, nutmeg and other fall-tinged spices which contribute to pumpkin’s autumnal reputation. I can’t really talk… I practice the same prejudice but perhaps it’s time for a pumpkin revolution. Go ahead… make this pumpkin roll in the summer. I dare you. Your family and friends will love you for it. That, I guarantee… it’s a fantastic recipe.

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10 outside the drawer uses for ordinary kitchen gadgets

Kitchen Gadgets

In my experience, streamlining tools is something cooks rarely do. Bring on the gadgets — zester, lemon squeezer, cheese grater — and I’m in kitchen heaven. But small kitchens need tools that multitask. This article reveals some insights and tips from Celebrity Chefs like Andrew Zimmern, Curtis Stone and Ellie Krieger on how to get the most out of the gadgets you already own.

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Main course recipe: The perfect herbed roasted chicken

Herbed Roasted Chicken

Is there a better smell in a home than roasting chicken? The way the fat melts all over the skin, basting the meat with all its goodness… it permeates a room with tummy-rumbling aromas. Mmmm. It’s taken many years to craft my quintessential roasted chicken recipe — it captures the simplicity of an easy-to-cook pleasure. Make this five-ingredient recipe your own by changing up the herbs as you like them — I like rosemary, parsley and thyme. It features very little hands-on time — weeknight dinner prep time even. Try it with any of these side dish recipes and a bottle of unoaked Chardonnay or subtle Pinot Noir. It’s taken many years to craft my quintessential roasted chicken recipe that captures the simplicity of this pleasure. Make this five-ingredient recipe your own by changing up the herbs as you like them — I like rosemary, parsley and thyme. It features very little hands-on time — weeknight dinner even. Try it with any of these side dish recipes and a bottle of unoaked Chardonnay or subtle Pinot Noir.

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Recipe: Cauliflower cous cous with bacon

Caulflower Couscous

I firmly believe that cauliflower has experienced a renaissance because of the South Beach and Paleo diets. Both of these lifestyles embrace a wide variety of vegetables, and getting creative is crucial to keeping things exciting. In these lifestyles, cauliflower subs for starch in many different ways but especially mashed potatoes and, in this instance, pasta. Nutritionally, however, this white veggie is far from a starch. Loaded with vitamins C and B-12, it’s also high on the fiber list and even sports some protein. This recipe for faux “couscous” could also become a main course if you add some cooked chicken or ham.

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Recipe: Blackened wild salmon with lemon and rub

Blackened salmon

Like chicken, salmon is thankfully super easy to cook. The only thing you have to be careful of is not to overcook the delicate flesh. I normally pull my salmon off the grill or pan when it’s still a little reddish-pink in the middle… it’s a consistency I enjoy. I’m also an advocate for wild salmon, and most are sourced from the Pacific Ocean. For flavor, texture, nutrients and color, king (or Chinook), sockeye and coho are all superior to any farmed salmon. But if that’s all you can find, don’t hold back

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In Season Now: Tomato recipes, how to choose, store and keep

Tomato Salad

Approaching September, tomatoes are coming on strong in the grocery stores and in home gardens across the nation. This crop is the #1 homegrown item since they’re pretty easy to grow and, well, homemade always tastes best. If you’re not a gardener, the rising popularity of farmer’s markets (finally!) also makes it easier to source delicious, vine-ripened tomatoes. Since these are my favorite veg… er.. fruit, I get a little excited about this. To choose the right ones and to keep these savory fruits fresh and scrumptious, here are a few tips plus some recipes to try with tomatoes.

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Side Recipe: Roasted acorn squash tossed with spicy vinaigrette

Roasted Acorn Squash with Spicy Vinaigrette

Acorn squash is often a surprise “volunteer” arrival in my spring compost bin, when the scooped out seeds sprout with the warmth of the season. I’m able to grow a couple squashes before the plant realizes that summer heat is upon it and it goes dormant. Normally, acorn squash grows in winter but it’s available year-round. It’s a transplant from South America, where squash is abundant in the cooking and in the culture. Full of vitamins A, C, and B, they’re also rich with potassium, fiber and magnesium. This recipe takes a few more steps but it is well worth the effort. Eat the skin and all… it turns into a delicious, savory/sweet candy. The tart vinaigrette gives it a brightness that is not to be missed.

Read more: Side Recipe: Baked acorn squash tossed with spicy vinaigrette